Diversity

Amid this talk of Muslim registries and Japanese internments, let’s stop to praise Fred Korematsu

Since the election, members of President-elect Donald Trump’s transition team, such as Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, have discussed reinstating a registry for immigrants from countries with active terrorist groups.

Some proponents have cited the registry for Japanese-Americans during World War II as a precedent for targeted, profiling registries. These registries were a tool in removing Japanese-Americans from “designated military areas” and forcing them into internment camps or deporting them.

As a member of the 30th Congressional District Asian Advisory Committee, I asked Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson for support in requesting that Texas honor the late Fred Korematsu, a Japanese-American who refused to report to an internment camp.

Continue Reading at The Dallas Morning News…

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1/30/17 Google celebrates the late Fred Korematsu’s 98th Birthday

 

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Diversity

Why Women Leave Law Firms, And What Anusia Gillespie Hopes To Do About It

“Who had Eminem on the first album? / Who had Kanye saying, ‘She a problem’? / Who came in the game, made her own column?”Nicki Minaj

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Anusia Gillespie, Banava Co. Founder

Anusia Gillespie, founder and principal consultant of Banava Consulting, recently wrote an article for Law360 titled The Horrible Conflict Between Biology And Women Attorneys. In her article, she cites the top two reasons why attorneys leave their law firms: (1) unsustainable billable hours and work/life considerations, and (2) a limiting culture.

Do you agree?

Gillespie was born and raised in Marblehead, a small town in the North Shore region outside Boston. It didn’t take very long for her to know that she wanted to be involved with the legal profession in some way, shape, or form. Continue Reading…

Diversity

America, did Aylan Kurdi die in vain?

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A little more than a year ago, the Dallas Morning News ran a picture of a drowned 3-year-old Syrian boy who washed up on the beach. The photo accompanied a column I had written about the rhetoric of the recent presidential campaigns. I couldn’t help but think about how our national political rhetoric might be causing waves of international consequence. At the very least, I hoped 3-year-old Aylan Kurdi did not die in vain.

Continue Reading on The Dallas Morning News…

#NoBanNoWall #Diversity #America